The Calgary SDGs

Imagine Calgary – Target 46: By 2036, 95 per cent of all people living in Calgary are at or above Statistics Canada’s Low-income Cut-off (LICO) rates; there is no child poverty.
Enough for All – Reduce poverty in Calgary by 50% by 2023
Enough for All – By 2023, 95% of all people living in Calgary are at or above Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-off (LICO) rates.
Enough for All – By 2023, 90% of all people living in Calgary are at or above 125% of Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-off (LICO) rates.
Enough for All – By 2018, Calgarians consider reducing poverty to be a high priority
Enough for All – Concentrations of poverty are reduced so that no community in Calgary has a poverty rate of 30% or more.
Enough for All – All Calgarians report that they have at least 3 people they can rely on for support in times of need.
Enough for All – Calgary has the highest Employment Quality in Canada.
Enough for All – 95% of working Calgarians are earning a living wage.
Enough for All – Calgarians have the best credit risk score in Canada.
Enough for All – All Calgary households have a three month emergency savings fund.
Enough for All – Everyone who needs a service can access it within a timely manner, regardless of income.
Enough for All – Calgarians only need to tell their story once when accessing services.
Enough for All – All those who require income assistance receive sufficient support.
Enough for All – By 2023, Aboriginal poverty rates are identical to Calgary’s overall poverty rate
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there is an increase in the % of people living in Calgary at or above Statistics Canada’s Low-income Cut-off (LICO) rate.

Imagine Calgary – Target 7: By 2036, Calgarians support local food production.
Imagine Calgary – Target 8: By 2036, Calgary maintains access to reliable and quality food sources.
Imagine Calgary – Target 9: By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgary’s food supply derives from sources that practice sustainable food production.
Imagine Calgary – Target 10: By 2010, 100 per cent of Calgarians have access to nutritious foods.
Imagine Calgary – Target 73: By 2036, sustainable urban food production increases to five per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 74: By 2036, the consumption of urban- and regionally produced food by Calgarians increases to 30 per cent.
Enough for All – Calgary Food Bank usage is significantly reduced.

Imagine Calgary – Target 92: By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians receive sufficient information and support to maintain and improve their health and foster their independence at all ages and stages of life.
Imagine Calgary – Target 93: By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians can obtain quality, affordable, timely and appropriate health information and services, as measured by satisfaction levels.
Imagine Calgary – Target 94: By 2036, the incidences of preventable illness, injury and premature death are significantly reduced.
Imagine Calgary – Target 95: By 2036, 85 per cent of Calgarians, in all age groups, maintain excellent or very good mental health.
Imagine Calgary – Target 107: By 2036, 90 per cent of people living in Calgary report that they participate in active lifestyles that include informal and structured recreational opportunities.
Imagine Calgary – Target 108: By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians report that they can access a range of high-quality recreational experiences, regardless of gender, socio-economic status, age, ability, religion, race, sexual orientation or heritage.
Imagine Calgary – Target 110: By 2036, 95 per cent of children aged two to five years exhibit high levels of emotional well-being and age-appropriate levels of attention span and impulse control, as measured by the Ages and Stages Questionnaire.
Imagine Calgary – Target 111: By 2036, 95 per cent of children aged six to 11 years report a high sense of self-worth, and 80 per cent of Calgary adolescents, both male and female, describe themselves as productive or potentially productive members of society, able to change themselves or their lives through their own actions, having the personal power to effect change in the world and being optimistic about their futures.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of Calgarians report that they have convenient access to indoor recreation facilities within their area of the city.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, the availability of recreational opportunities and the percentage of Calgarians satisfied with these opportunities to participate in active lifestyles are increased or maintained (including formal, structured, and unstructured recreational opportunities).
TRC – Call 5: We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate parenting programs for Aboriginal families
TRC – Call 18: We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to acknowledge that the current state of Aboriginal health in Canada is a direct result of previous Canadian government policies, including residential schools, and to recognize and implement the health-care rights of Aboriginal people as identified in international law, constitutional law, and under the Treaties.
TRC – Call 19: We call upon the federal government, in consultation with Aboriginal peoples, to establish measurable goals to identify and close the gaps in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities, and to publish annual progress reports and assess longterm trends. Such efforts would focus on indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.
TRC – Call 20: In order to address the jurisdictional disputes concerning Aboriginal people who do not reside on reserves, we call upon the federal government to recognize, respect, and address the distinct health needs of the Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve Aboriginal peoples.
TRC – Call 21: We call upon the federal government to provide sustainable funding for existing and new Aboriginal healing centres to address the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual harms caused by residential schools, and to ensure that the funding of healing centres in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories is a priority.
TRC – Call 22: We call upon those who can effect change within the Canadian health-care system to recognize the value of Aboriginal healing practices and use them in the treatment of Aboriginal patients in collaboration with Aboriginal healers and Elders where requested by Aboriginal patients.
TRC – Call 23: We call upon all levels of government to:
i. Increase the number of Aboriginal professionals working in the health-care field.
ii. Ensure the retention of Aboriginal health-care providers in Aboriginal communities.
iii. Provide cultural competency training for all healthcare professionals.
TRC – Call 24: We call upon medical and nursing schools in Canada to require all students to take a course dealing with Aboriginal health issues, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, and Indigenous teachings and practices. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.
TRC – Call 33: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.
TRC – Call 34: We call upon the governments of Canada, the provinces, and territories to undertake reforms to the criminal justice system to better address the needs of offenders with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), including:
i. Providing increased community resources and powers for courts to ensure that FASD is properly diagnosed, and that appropriate community supports are in place for those with FASD.
ii. Enacting statutory exemptions from mandatory minimum sentences of imprisonment for offenders affected by FASD.
iii. Providing community, correctional, and parole resources to maximize the ability of people with FASD to live in the community.
iv. Adopting appropriate evaluation mechanisms to measure the effectiveness of such programs and ensure community safety.
TRC – Call 35: We call upon the federal government to eliminate barriers to the creation of additional Aboriginal healing lodges within the federal correctional system.
TRC – Call 87: We call upon all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, sports halls of fame, and other relevant organizations, to provide public education that tells the national story of Aboriginal athletes in history.
TRC – Call 88: We call upon all levels of government to take action to ensure long-term Aboriginal athlete development and growth, and continued support for the North American Indigenous Games, including funding to host the games and for provincial and territorial team preparation and travel.
TRC – Call 89: We call upon the federal government to amend the Physical Activity and Sport Act to support reconciliation by ensuring that policies to promote physical activity as a fundamental element of health and well-being, reduce barriers to sports participation, increase the pursuit of excellence in sport, and build capacity in the Canadian sport system, are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples.
TRC – Call 90: We call upon the federal government to ensure that national sports policies, programs, and initiatives are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples, including, but not limited to, establishing:
i. In collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, stable funding for, and access to, community sports programs that reflect the diverse
cultures and traditional sporting activities of Aboriginal peoples.
ii. An elite athlete development program for Aboriginal athletes.
iii. Programs for coaches, trainers, and sports officials that are culturally relevant for Aboriginal peoples.
iv. Anti-racism awareness and training programs.
TRC – Call 91: We call upon the officials and host countries of international sporting events such as the Olympics, Pan Am, and Commonwealth games to ensure that Indigenous peoples’ territorial protocols are respected, and local Indigenous communities are engaged in all aspects of planning and participating in such events.

Imagine Calgary – Target 1: By 2036, 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they are informed.
Imagine Calgary – Target 41: By 2036, the high school graduation rate for individuals up to age 21 increases to 95 per cent, and 75 per cent of adults aged 21 to 25 complete a post-secondary or vocational education program.
Imagine Calgary – Target 42: By 2036, 95 per cent of entrants in trades-related programs complete their programs and 98 per cent of graduates are employed in their fields of study within six months of graduation.
Imagine Calgary – Target 96: By 2016, by the age of six years, 95 per cent of Calgary children exhibit school readiness, as reflected by physical well-being and appropriate motor development; emotional health and a positive approach to new experiences; age-appropriate social knowledge and competence; age-appropriate language skills; and age-appropriate general knowledge and cognitive skills.
Imagine Calgary – Target 97: By 2016, 95 per cent of Calgary students succeed in elementary and junior high school, as measured by standardized achievement testing in grades three, six and nine and alternate education metrics.
Imagine Calgary – Target 98: By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgary youth complete high school by age 21 and complete some form of post-secondary education or training by age 25.
Imagine Calgary – Target 99: By 2016, 100 per cent of adult Calgarians have access to a full range of formal and informal quality learning opportunities and resource options that allow them to achieve their full potentials in life.
Imagine Calgary – Target 100: By 2016, 95 per cent of adult Calgarians have the minimum levels of literacy and numeracy — as defined by the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey — required to fully participate in the economy and all aspects of life in Calgary.
TRC – Call 7: We call upon the federal government to develop with Aboriginal groups a joint strategy to eliminate educational and employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians
TRC – Call 8: We call upon the federal government to eliminate the discrepancy in federal education funding for First Nations children being educated on reserves and those First Nations children being educated off reserves
TRC – Call 9: We call upon the federal government to prepare and publish annual reports comparing funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves, as well as educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with nonAboriginal people.
TRC – Call 10: We call on the federal government to draft new Aboriginal education legislation with the full participation and informed consent of Aboriginal peoples. The new legislation would include a commitment to sufficient funding and would incorporate the following principles:
i. Providing sufficient funding to close identified educational achievement gaps within one generation.
ii. Improving education attainment levels and success rates.
iii. Developing culturally appropriate curricula.
iv. Protecting the right to Aboriginal languages, including the teaching of Aboriginal languages as credit courses.
v. Enabling parental and community responsibility, control, and accountability, similar to what parents enjoy in public school systems.
vi. Enabling parents to fully participate in the education of their children.
vii. Respecting and honouring Treaty relationships.
TRC – Call 11: We call upon the federal government to provide adequate funding to end the backlog of First Nations students seeking a post-secondary education
TRC – Call 12: We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Aboriginal families.
TRC – Call 16: We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages.
TRC – Call 57: We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.
TRC – Call 59: We call upon church parties to the Settlement Agreement to develop ongoing education strategies to ensure that their respective congregations learn about their church’s role in colonization, the history and legacy of residential schools, and why apologies to former residential school students, their families, and communities were necessary.
TRC – Call 60: We call upon leaders of the church parties to the Settlement Agreement and all other faiths, in collaboration with Indigenous spiritual leaders, Survivors, schools of theology, seminaries, and other religious training centres, to develop and teach curriculum for all student clergy, and all clergy and staff who work in Aboriginal communities, on the need to respect Indigenous spirituality in its own right, the history and legacy of residential schools and the roles of the church parties in that system, the history and legacy of religious conflict in Aboriginal families and communities, and the responsibility that churches have to mitigate such conflicts and prevent spiritual violence.
TRC – Call 62: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, in consultation and collaboration with Survivors, Aboriginal peoples, and educators, to:
i. Make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal peoples’ historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandatory education requirement for Kindergarten to Grade Twelve students.
ii. Provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms.
iii. Provide the necessary funding to Aboriginal schools to utilize Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in classrooms.
iv. Establish senior-level positions in government at the assistant deputy minister level or higher dedicated to Aboriginal content in education.
TRC – Call 63: We call upon the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada to maintain an annual commitment to Aboriginal education issues, including:
i. Developing and implementing Kindergarten to Grade Twelve curriculum and learning resources on Aboriginal peoples in Canadian history, and the history and legacy of residential schools.
ii. Sharing information and best practices on teaching curriculum related to residential schools and Aboriginal history.
iii. Building student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect.
iv. Identifying teacher-training needs relating to the above.
TRC – Call 64: We call upon all levels of government that provide public funds to denominational schools to require such schools to provide an education on comparative religious studies, which must include a segment on Aboriginal spiritual beliefs and practices developed in collaboration with Aboriginal Elders.
TRC – Call 65: We call upon the federal government, through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, post-secondary institutions and educators, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and its partner institutions, to establish a national research program with multi-year funding to advance understanding of reconciliation.
TRC – Call 86: We call upon Canadian journalism programs and media schools to require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations.
TRC – Call 84: We call upon the federal government to restore and increase funding to the CBC/Radio-Canada, to enable Canada’s national public broadcaster to support reconciliation, and be properly reflective of the diverse cultures, languages, and perspectives of Aboriginal peoples, including, but not limited to:
i. Increasing Aboriginal programming, including Aboriginal-language speakers.
ii. Increasing equitable access for Aboriginal peoples to jobs, leadership positions, and professional development opportunities within the organization.
iii. Continuing to provide dedicated news coverage and online public information resources on issues of concern to Aboriginal peoples and all Canadians,
including the history and legacy of residential schools and the reconciliation process.
TRC – Call 85: We call upon the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, as an independent non-profit broadcaster with programming by, for, and about Aboriginal peoples, to support reconciliation, including but not limited to:
i. Continuing to provide leadership in programming and organizational culture that reflects the diverse cultures, languages, and perspectives of Aboriginal
peoples.
ii. Continuing to develop media initiatives that inform and educate the Canadian public, and connect

Imagine Calgary – Target 106: By 2036, the percentage of Calgary women who have been assaulted by their intimate partners at least once in the past five years is reduced from approximately 11 per cent to three per cent.

Imagine Calgary – Target 80: By 2036, per capita water consumption is reduced by 40 per cent.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, drinking water and treated wastewater effluent will continue to meet provincial regulations for quality 100 % of the time.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, accommodate Calgary’s population with the same amount of water withdrawn from the river as 2003.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, diversify Calgary’s future water supply to align with water demand.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, the per capita daily residential demand will be 210 litres per person per day.

Imagine Calgary – Target 5: By 2036, 30 per cent of Calgary’s energy derives from low-impact renewable sources.
Imagine Calgary – Target 67: By 2036, energy consumption is reduced by 30 per cent based on 1999 use.
Imagine Calgary – Target 68: By 2036, the use of low-impact renewable energy increases by 30 per cent as a percentage of total energy use.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system enables a high quality of life for Albertans by meeting our energy needs reliably and affordably.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system contributes to reconciliation between Alberta’s Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system is inclusive, accessible, and equitable to current and future generations.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system enhances the health of our natural environment and the health of Albertans.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system is net carbon-neutral for the production and consumption of energy in Alberta.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system is a continued source of economic prosperity for the province and the country.
Energy Futures Lab – 2050 Alberta’s energy system is diverse, resilient, and adaptable.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Radically increase carbon efficiency and lower environmental impact in energy production.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Pioneer innovative, high-value uses for carbon and carbon dioxide beyond combustion.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Make major advances on the development, manufacturing, and deployment of renewable energy in Alberta.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Dramatically reduce energy use through the development of smart energy communities throughout Alberta, including in Indigenous communities.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Empower Albertans to participate in more local and distributed sustainable alternative energy supply.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Build awareness and literacy broadly in Alberta about the full spectrum of energy choices and costs.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Pioneer transparent policy development processes and decision-making tools that reflect long-term thinking and integrated approaches.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Engage the hearts and imaginations of Albertans in energy system transition.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Support the transfer and development of new skills in Alberta’s labour force to help workers and communities thrive in a low-carbon economy.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Support initiatives where Indigenous peoples lead innovation in sustainable energy development.
Energy Futures Lab – Near Term: Dramatically reduce energy used for the transportation of people and goods.

Imagine Calgary – Target 12: By 2016, Calgary has a strong and diverse portfolio of locally based businesses.
Imagine Calgary – Target 36: By 2036, Calgary’s non-oil-related industries grow by 50 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 37: By 2036, Calgary is ranked as the most favourable Canadian city in which to establish businesses that support sustainability practices.
Imagine Calgary – Target 38: By 2036, tourist visitations and expenditures grow by 90 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 39: By 2036, alternative ways to measure economic well-being are commonly used to support sustainability principles in decision-making.
Imagine Calgary – Target 40: By 2036, full employment of the labour force (defined as unemployment below five per cent) is sustained.
Imagine Calgary – Target 43: By 2036, all adult immigrants to Calgary have the opportunity to integrate into the economy through employment or entrepreneurial activity at the same participation or success rate as other Calgarians.
Imagine Calgary – Target 44: By 2036, 85 per cent of employees express a high degree of job satisfaction.
Imagine Calgary – Target 45: By 2036, healthy seniors have the opportunity to be engaged in fulfilling work that contributes to the economy and/or the community.
Imagine Calgary – Target 47: By 2036, all children of low-income families who are residents of Calgary have the opportunity to complete post-secondary education or appropriate training to enable them to fully participate in the economy.
Enough for All – Calgary has the highest Employment Quality in Canada.
Enough for All – 95% of working Calgarians are earning a living wage.
Enough for All – By 2023, Aboriginal workers will earn an income equal to that of the rest of the Calgary workforce.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there is an increase in the diversity of business sectors in Calgary.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there is a sustained labour force in Calgary.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there is an increase in the number of businesses that support sustainable practices.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, total debt & debt servicing returns to 50% or lower of Municipal Government Act (MGA) debt limit by 2020.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, tax supported debt per capita does not exceed $1000 and debt servicing for tax supported debt does not exceed 10% of gross expenditures net of recoveries
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, total City operating expenditures per capita (inflation adjusted for the Municipal Price Index) are maintained or reduced.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, fully loaded expenditures per capita for a given level of service are measured/tracked for each service periodically.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, property & business taxes as a percentage of total revenue are maintained or reduced.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020 The City does not have a planned surplus and actual surpluses are less than 1% of budgeted operating expenditures.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020 The City does not use debt or one-time funding from reserves to fund any base operating budget expenditures.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, level of Unallocated Reserves: Fiscal Stability Reserve equals 10 – 15% of Gross City Expenditures.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Credit Rating is maintained at AA+.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City of Calgary employees represent the diversity of Calgary’s available workforce.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020 the annual non-retirement turnover for The City of Calgary is less than 5%.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City of Calgary’s recordable injury rate is best in class for Canadian Municipalities.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 90% of City buildings and 100% of the workplaces provided to City of Calgary employees are in good condition (15% Facility Condition Index/ 75% Workplace Condition Index ) and 100% of administrative workspace will have a completed workspace condition index rating.
TRC – Call 7: We call upon the federal government to develop with Aboriginal groups a joint strategy to eliminate educational and employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians
TRC – Call 92: We call upon the corporate sector in Canada to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a reconciliation framework and to apply its principles, norms, and standards to corporate policy and core operational activities involving Indigenous peoples and their lands and resources. This would include, but not be limited to, the following:
i. Commit to meaningful consultation, building respectful relationships, and obtaining the free, prior, and informed consent of Indigenous peoples before proceeding with economic development projects.
ii. Ensure that Aboriginal peoples have equitable access to jobs, training, and education opportunities in the corporate sector, and that Aboriginal communities gain long-term sustainable benefits from economic development projects.
iii. Provide education for management and staff on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

Imagine Calgary – Target 2: By 2036, all Calgarians have easy access to current forms of communications technology and resources.
Imagine Calgary – Target 3: By 2036, Calgarians increase their use of communications technology to support sustainability.
Imagine Calgary – Target 6: By 2036, all new and retrofitted communities, buildings, vehicles, equipment and processes are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.
Imagine Calgary – Target 16: By 2036, all new and retrofitted non-residential buildings are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy- and water-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.
Imagine Calgary – Target 19: By 2036, all new and retrofitted residential buildings are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.
Imagine Calgary – Target 34: By 2036, research and development intensity, both public and private, increases to five per cent of Calgary’s gross domestic product.
Imagine Calgary – Target 35: By 2036, the number of environmentally sustainable and commercially viable value-added products and technologies produced in Calgary increases by 100 per cent.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Communities will have demonstrated the resiliency to selfactivate to respond to natural disasters.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, a higher percentage of Calgary’s gross domestic product is invested in research and development.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 25% of the current vacant former gas station sites (within an Area Redevelopment Plan) will be returned to productive community use.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, fuel storage sites located within residential communities will be redeveloped within 3 years of the termination of their original use.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City has completed plans for land development and disposition of two City-owned surplus.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, increase per cent of intermodal and warehousing facilities within 1600m (actual) of the Primary Goods Movement Network to 77% (Goods access).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, decrease the buffer index (extra time needed to ensure ontime arrival) (Travel time reliability on selected goods movement corridors).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, maintain or improve the average travel time on selected Goods Movement Network corridors, by reducing traffic delays (Average speed on selected goods movement corridors).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of the implemented Primary Transit Network will have transit priority measures, to provide faster, more convenient transit service.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of traffic signals in the city will be optimized, to improve traffic flow and reduce congestion.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 80% of roadway pavement meets good or very good condition ratings (Pavement Quality Index Standards) (Asset management – Roads).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 80% of City recreation facilities are maintained at a level B standard or higher.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City of Calgary has achieved appropriate levels of service within acceptable levels of infrastructure condition, performance, investment and risk and is effectively managing the Infrastructure Gap.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, the practice of Asset Management at The City of Calgary will achieve a minimum level four out of five compliance with respect to the Asset Management Policy. There will be demonstrated alignment to its Growth Management Strategy and MDP/CTP, as well as to other corporate financial and business planning processes.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City of Calgary efficiently and effectively disposes of surplus City owned land to provide optimum value for Calgarians.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of City leaders responsible for asset management plan activities and/or project management of capital infrastructure initiatives will have corporate asset management and/or project management competencies (i.e. skills, knowledge and experience).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of the city assets (i.e. building and facilities) will adhere to the Municipal Naming Policy.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, the City’s web mapping framework and associated spatial information is compliant with all relevant ISO standards.

Imagine Calgary – Target 87: By 2016, 90 per cent of Calgarians report that they have opportunities to express their unique gifts and talents.
Imagine Calgary – Target 88: By 2021, 90 per cent of Calgarians report that Calgary is a city that promotes creative freedom.
Imagine Calgary – Target 101: By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens agree that “Calgary is a city with soul,” which is defined as citizens having meaning and purpose in life and experiencing ongoing feelings of connectedness with some form of human, historic or natural system.
Imagine Calgary – Target 102: By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians report that they feel respected and supported in their pursuits of meaning, purpose and connectedness, and that they extend respect and support to others who meet this need in ways different from their own.
Imagine Calgary – Target 112: By 2010, 90 per cent of Calgarians agree that there is a strong sense of community in Calgary, and at least 80 per cent of Calgarians report high levels of satisfaction, sense of belonging, attachment and civic pride.
Imagine Calgary – Target 113: By 2010, 80 per cent of citizens experience a high sense of community in their neighbourhoods and affinity-related communities, as reflected by residents’ reports of neighbourhood participation and volunteering, sense of belonging, neighbourliness and reciprocity, sense of efficacy, attachment, safety and voter turnout.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of eligible low-income Calgarians have improved access to low-income programs and services.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, City facilities and spaces incorporate Corporate Access Design Standards for physical, sensory and cognitive disabilities
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, a continuum of built and natural park spaces is available to citizens on a ‘community cluster/regional’ approach.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Calgary will be an age friendly city.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, City programs and services will demonstrate inclusiveness
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, cultural landscapes are conserved and enjoyed as a valued piece of Calgary’s heritage.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of Calgarians will have access to arts and culture programs and facilities within their area of the city.
TRC – Call 43: We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.
TRC – Call 44: We call upon the Government of Canada to develop a national action plan, strategies, and other concrete measures to achieve the goals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
TRC – Call 45: We call upon the Government of Canada, on behalf of all Canadians, to jointly develop with Aboriginal peoples a Royal Proclamation of Reconciliation to be issued by the Crown. The proclamation would build on the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Treaty of Niagara of 1764, and reaffirm the nation-to-nation relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown. The proclamation would include, but not be limited to, the following commitments:
i. Repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius.
ii. Adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.
iii. Renew or establish Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.
iv. Reconcile Aboriginal and Crown constitutional and legal orders to ensure that Aboriginal peoples are full partners in Confederation, including the
recognition and integration of Indigenous laws and legal traditions in negotiation and implementation processes involving Treaties, land claims, and other
constructive agreements.
TRC – Call 46: We call upon the parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to develop and sign a Covenant of Reconciliation that would identify principles for working collaboratively to advance reconciliation in Canadian society, and that would include, but not be limited to:
i. Reaffirmation of the parties’ commitment to reconciliation.
ii. Repudiation of concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius,
and the reformation of laws, governance structures, and policies within their respective institutions that continue to rely on such concepts.
iii. Full adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.
iv. Support for the renewal or establishment of Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.
v. Enabling those excluded from the Settlement Agreement to sign onto the Covenant of Reconciliation.
vi. Enabling additional parties to sign onto the Covenant of Reconciliation.
TRC – Call 48: We call upon the church parties to the Settlement Agreement, and all other faith groups and interfaith social justice groups in Canada who have not already done so, to formally adopt and comply with the principles, norms, and standards of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. This would include, but not be limited to, the following commitments:
i. Ensuring that their institutions, policies, programs, and practices comply with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
ii. Respecting Indigenous peoples’ right to selfdetermination in spiritual matters, including the right to practise, develop, and teach their own spiritual and religious traditions, customs, and ceremonies, consistent with Article 12:1 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
iii. Engaging in ongoing public dialogue and actions to support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
iv. Issuing a statement no later than March 31, 2016, from all religious denominations and faith groups, as to how they will implement the United Nations
Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
TRC – Call 49: We call upon all religious denominations and faith groups who have not already done so to repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius.
TRC – Call 93: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the national Aboriginal organizations, to revise the information kit for newcomers to Canada and its citizenship test to reflect a more inclusive history of the diverse Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including information about the Treaties and the history of residential schools.
TRC – Call 94: We call upon the Government of Canada to replace the Oath of Citizenship with the following:
“I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, Her Heirs and Successors, and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada including Treaties with Indigenous Peoples, and fulfill my duties as a Canadian citizen.”

Imagine Calgary – Target 4: By 2036, Calgary increases the number of facilities and spaces that encourage human interaction, and they are widely distributed throughout the city.
Imagine Calgary – Target 14: By 2036, we are developing “complete communities” that, among other aspects, allow people to obtain daily goods and services within a reasonable walking distance from home.
Imagine Calgary – Target 15: By 2036, all new commercial buildings are designed to encourage the use of alternative forms of transportation (e.g. walking, cycling and transit).
Imagine Calgary – Target 17: By 2036, all commercial buildings are accessible to people with disabilities.
Imagine Calgary – Target 18: By 2016, we are developing “complete communities” that enable people to meet most of their daily needs within a reasonable walking distance from home.
Imagine Calgary – Target 20: By 2036, all Calgarians have the option of spending less than 30 per cent of their gross family incomes on housing.
Imagine Calgary – Target 21: By 2036, the Calgary market can meet the housing needs of those below the Low-income Cut-off (LICO).
Imagine Calgary – Target 22: By 2036, we reduce the annual private vehicle kilometres travelled per capita by 20 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 23: By 2016, we increase the residential population within walking distance (600 metres) of LRT stations and major transit nodes by 100 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 24: By 2016, we increase the number of jobs within walking distance (600 metres) of LRT stations and major transit nodes by 35 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 26: By 2036, we increase peak period transit, walking and cycling and carpool travel to downtown by 50 per cent, 40 per cent and 20 per cent respectively.
Imagine Calgary – Target 27: By 2036, 100 per cent of public transit services (buses, CTrains and facilities) are accessible to people with disabilities.
Imagine Calgary – Target 28: By 2036, transit trips per capita increase 40 per cent over 2006 levels.
Imagine Calgary – Target 29: By 2036, the number of on-street bikeways increases by 200 per cent, and the number of pathways by 100 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 30: By 2036, fatal collisions per 100,000 people and injury collisions per 1,000 people decrease by 50 per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 62: By 2036, all publicly provided goods and services are affordable, accessible and priced in accordance with their public benefits.
Imagine Calgary – Target 85: By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens report that Calgary is a beautiful city.
Imagine Calgary – Target 86: By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians report that they have a range of opportunities for the aesthetic enjoyment of nature, arts and culture.
Imagine Calgary – Target 89: By 2026, 90 per cent of Calgarians report that participation in creative activities is an important part of their lives.
Imagine Calgary – Target 91: By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians enjoy positive and supportive living conditions, as reflected by adequate income; high rates of employment; adequate food and appropriate nutrition; appropriate, adequate and affordable housing; and high levels of personal safety.
Enough for All – Homeless shelter utilization is significantly reduced.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 600 festival and event days per year will be supported by The City.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, increase land use diversity index to 0.56 (Mix Land Use).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, increase the residential diversity index in communities to 0.23 (Residential Mix).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City of Calgary will enable affordable housing choices targeting 600 – 800 new units in new and established communities.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, plans for all new and redeveloped communities will include community services infrastructure that accommodates the diverse social, recreational and public safety needs of residents.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 15% of population and 43% of jobs are within 400m of the Primary Transit Network (Accessibility to Primary Transit Network)
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 20% of population lives within Activity Centres or within 600m of Urban and Neighbourhood Corridors, with access to daily needs (Accessibility to Daily Needs)
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 10% of population growth is accommodated within 2005 Built Up Urban Area (Urban Expansion).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 30% of net new residential units are accommodated within 2005 Built Up Urban Area (Percentage of net residential unit growth)
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 27% of the total Primary Transit Network is implemented .
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 2.60 hours per capita of transit service is provided annually (Transit Service).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, mode split is 15% walking/cycling, 10% transit, 75% auto (Mode Split [All Purpose / 24hrs / Citywide]).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, 100% of the transit fleet is accessible to all Calgarians (Accessibility to transit).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, the average transit vehicle age is maintained at the 2009 levels (LRV 16 years, Bus 14 years) (Asset management – Calgary Transit).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there is a 10% decrease in the rate of reportable traffic collisions resulting in injuries and fatalities.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, more than 90% of Calgarians are satisfied with the overall quality of City Services.
TRC – Call 13: We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.
TRC – Call 14: We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles:
i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.
ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties.
iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation.
iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities.
v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages.
TRC – Call 15: We call upon the federal government to appoint, in consultation with Aboriginal groups, an Aboriginal Languages Commissioner. The commissioner should help promote Aboriginal languages and report on the adequacy of federal funding of Aboriginal-languages initiatives.
TRC – Call 61: We call upon church parties to the Settlement Agreement, in collaboration with Survivors and representatives of Aboriginal organizations, to establish permanent funding to Aboriginal people for:
i. Community-controlled healing and reconciliation projects.
ii. Community-controlled culture and language revitalization projects.
iii. Community-controlled education and relationship building projects.
iv. Regional dialogues for Indigenous spiritual leaders and youth to discuss Indigenous spirituality, self-determination, and reconciliation.
TRC – Call 66: We call upon the federal government to establish multi-year funding for community-based youth organizations to deliver programs on reconciliation, and establish a national network to share information and best practices.
TRC – Call 67: We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Museums Association to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of museum policies and best practices to determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to make recommendations.
TRC – Call 68: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, and the Canadian Museums Association to mark the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017 by establishing a dedicated national funding program for commemoration projects on the theme of reconciliation.
TRC – Call 69: We call upon Library and Archives Canada to:
i. Fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as
related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in the residential schools.
ii. Ensure that its record holdings related to residential schools are accessible to the public.
iii. Commit more resources to its public education materials and programming on residential schools.
TRC – Call 70: We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Association of Archivists to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of archival policies and best practices to:
i. Determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in the residential schools.
ii. Produce a report with recommendations for full implementation of these international mechanisms as a reconciliation framework for Canadian archives.
TRC – Call 77: We call upon provincial, territorial, municipal, and community archives to work collaboratively with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to identify and collect copies of all records relevant to the history and legacy of the residential school system, and to provide these to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.
TRC – Call 78: We call upon the Government of Canada to commit to making a funding contribution of $10 million over seven years to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, plus an additional amount to assist communities to research and produce histories of their own residential school experience and their involvement in truth, healing, and reconciliation.
TRC – Call 79: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Survivors, Aboriginal organizations, and the arts community, to develop a reconciliation framework for Canadian heritage and commemoration. This would include, but not be limited to:
i. Amending the Historic Sites and Monuments Act to include First Nations, Inuit, and Métis representation on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada and its Secretariat.
ii. Revising the policies, criteria, and practices of the National Program of Historical Commemoration to integrate Indigenous history, heritage values, and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.
iii. Developing and implementing a national heritage plan and strategy for commemorating residential school sites, the history and legacy of residential schools, and the contributions of Aboriginal peoples to Canada’s history.
TRC – Call 80: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to establish, as a statutory holiday, a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to honour Survivors, their families, and communities, and ensure that public commemoration of the history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.
TRC – Call 81: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Survivors and their organizations, and other parties to the Settlement Agreement, to commission and install a publicly accessible, highly visible, Residential Schools National Monument in the city of Ottawa to honour Survivors and all the children who were lost to their families and communities.
TRC – Call 82: We call upon provincial and territorial governments, in collaboration with Survivors and their organizations, and other parties to the Settlement Agreement, to commission and install a publicly accessible, highly visible, Residential Schools Monument in each capital city to honour Survivors and all the children who were lost to their families and communities.
TRC – Call 83: We call upon the Canada Council for the Arts to establish, as a funding priority, a strategy for Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to undertake collaborative projects and produce works that contribute to the reconciliation process.

Imagine Calgary – Target 11: By 2036, over 50 per cent of Calgary businesses adopt a protocol for sustainable practices and report on it regularly.
Imagine Calgary – Target 13: By 2036, all Calgarians consume more responsibly.
Imagine Calgary – Target 31: By 2036, 85 per cent of the waste generated within Calgary is diverted from landfills.
Imagine Calgary – Target 32: By 2036, 75 per cent of construction industry waste materials are recovered for reuse and/or recycling.
Imagine Calgary – Target 33: By 2036, 85 per cent of waste materials are converted to other useful products.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, achieve 80% diversion of waste from City-run landfills.

Imagine Calgary – Target 25: By 2036, there is a 50 per cent reduction from 1990 levels in the pollution (greenhouse gases) associated with automobiles.
Imagine Calgary – Target 69: By 2012, total community greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by six per cent from 1990 levels; by 2036, they’re reduced by 50 per cent from 1990 levels and criteria air contaminants are also significantly reduced.
Imagine Calgary – Target 70: By 2036, indoor air contaminants are reduced to zero per cent.
Imagine Calgary – Target 71: By 2036, Calgary’s ecological decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, greenhouse gas emissions will be reduced by 20% from 2005 baseline.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Calgary’s ambient air quality meets or surpasses national and provincial air quality standards, objectives and guidelines.

Imagine Calgary – Target 81: By 2036, positive rates of flow in the Bow River Basin are maintained to keep aquatic ecosystems at these levels.
Imagine Calgary – Target 82: By 2036, effective impervious areas are reduced equal to or below 30 per cent to restore natural hydrograph and become less susceptible to flooding.
Imagine Calgary – Target 83: By 2036, watershed health — as measured by loss of wetlands, water quality, non-compliance with pollution standards, in-stream flow and groundwater levels — improves.
Imagine Calgary – Target 84: By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, total loading targets continue to be met in The City’s License to Operate.

Imagine Calgary – Target 72: By 2036, land use efficiency increases by at least 30 per cent, as measured by public transit threshold and increased density.
Imagine Calgary – Target 75: By 2036, there is zero per cent new soil contamination.
Imagine Calgary – Target 76: By 2036, at least 30 per cent of existing contaminated sites are remediated.
Imagine Calgary – Target 77: By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Imagine Calgary – Target 78: By 2036, native biological diversity increases to healthy levels, as measured through Habitat Suitability Index indices and local key indicator species.
Imagine Calgary – Target 79: By 2036, the number and/or size of protected or restored habitats increases to a state of health and functionality.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, no adoptable animal is euthanized.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, no net loss of unique and environmentally significant habitat.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, species at risk are protected and have sustainable populations.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, significant landscapes and habitats in Calgary will be restored and/or reconnected.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, there will be an increase in the use of native plant xeriscaping in Calgary parks.

Imagine Calgary – Target 48: By 2016, 80 per cent of Calgarians report that they feel government activity is open, honest, inclusive and responsive.
Imagine Calgary – Target 49: By 2016, Calgary City Council establishes a participatory budgeting process.
Imagine Calgary – Target 50: By 2036, 100 per cent of non-criminal disputes are resolved by some form of collaborative process.
Imagine Calgary – Target 51: By 2036, 80 per cent of non-violent criminal offences are handled in the community in which the victim lives.
Imagine Calgary – Target 52: By 2020, 100 per cent of regulatory offences are enforced by the responsible governments, rather than through court processes.
Imagine Calgary – Target 53: By 2036, 100 per cent of personal conflicts among students, parents, teachers, administrators, support staff and elected representatives in the education system are resolved through collaborative means.
Imagine Calgary – Target 54: By 2021, the makeup of elected and appointed bodies reflects the diversity of the community.
Imagine Calgary – Target 56: By 2020, all public institutions and systems create and implement an urban Aboriginal policy that recognizes the detrimental colonial history experienced by First Nations, Metis and Inuit people; reduces barriers to public participation and governance; and supports economic, social and political advancement.
Imagine Calgary – Target 57: By 2036, racism and discrimination is dealt with by having public and private sector institutions and organizations throughout the city introduce meaningful and effective policies and processes and measurable outcomes.
Imagine Calgary – Target 58: By 2036, there is a 75 per cent turnout in municipal elections.
Imagine Calgary – Target 59: By 2036, there is a citizen-to-municipal-politician ratio of 55,000:1.
Imagine Calgary – Target 60: By 2036, The City of Calgary reduces its dependence on property taxes to no more than 25 per cent of revenue.
Imagine Calgary – Target 61: By 2036, all general revenues are based on the principle of progressive taxation.
Imagine Calgary – Target 63: By 2010, The City of Calgary has co-operative, supportive and mutually beneficial working relationships with governments in the region.
Imagine Calgary – Target 64: By 2016, governance is restructured to allow governments to create or reallocate authority so that effective decisions are made at the geographical scale that matches the processes involved.
Imagine Calgary – Target 103: By 2016, 95 per cent of Calgarians report that they feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhoods and walking alone downtown after dark.
Imagine Calgary – Target 104: By 2016, 95 per cent of Calgary parents report that they allow their children over six years old to play unsupervised on their own blocks.
Imagine Calgary – Target 105: By 2036, given that crime rates are driven primarily by the number of males in the population aged 15 to 24, the proportion of adolescents and young adults in conflict with the law decreases from 2006 levels of about one per cent to 0.01 per cent.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City demonstrates that a broad representation of our citizen’s voice is has been considered in setting priorities and delivering services.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, The City communication and engagement opportunities are available in multiple formats, channels and languages.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Calgary communities are increasingly able to resolve community-based problems.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, emergency response performance is maintained or improved.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, more than 86% of citizens report that Calgary is a safe city to live in (current baseline 86%).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, all citizens will have access to 911 using a variety of technologies, and 911 will have the capacity to manage all calls.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, total City operating expenditures per capita (inflation adjusted for the Municipal Price Index) are maintained or reduced.
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, Calgary’s 10 largest services will meet or exceed the average performance of comparable Canadian municipalities for both efficiency and effectiveness. (Target 75%).
Calgary 2020 – By 2020, city services will have undergone a zero-based review to identify service effectiveness and efficiency opportunities. (Target 80%).
TRC – Call 1: We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care by:
i. Monitoring and assessing neglect investigations.
ii. Providing adequate resources to enable Aboriginal communities and child-welfare organizations to keep Aboriginal families together where it is safe to do so, and to keep children in culturally appropriate environments, regardless of where they reside.
iii. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the history and impacts of residential schools.
iv. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the potential for Aboriginal communities and families to provide more appropriate solutions to family healing.
v. Requiring that all child-welfare decision makers consider the impact of the residential school experience on children and their caregivers.
TRC – Call 2: We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the provinces and territories, to prepare and publish annual reports on the number of Aboriginal children (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) who are in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, as well as the reasons for apprehension, the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies, and the effectiveness of various interventions.
TRC – Call 3: We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.
TRC – Call 4: We call upon the federal government to enact Aboriginal child-welfare legislation that establishes national standards for Aboriginal child apprehension and custody cases and includes principles that:
i. Affirm the right of Aboriginal governments to establish and maintain their own child-welfare agencies.
ii. Require all child-welfare agencies and courts to take the residential school legacy into account in their decision making.
iii. Establish, as an important priority, a requirement that placements of Aboriginal children into temporary and permanent care be culturally appropriate.
TRC – Call 6: We call upon the Government of Canada to repeal Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada
TRC – Call 17: We call upon all levels of government to enable residential school Survivors and their families to reclaim names changed by the residential school system by waiving administrative costs for a period of five years for the name-change process and the revision of official identity documents, such as birth certificates, passports, driver’s licenses, health cards, status cards, and social insurance numbers.
TRC – Call 25: We call upon the federal government to establish a written policy that reaffirms the independence of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to investigate crimes in which the government has its own interest as a potential or real party in civil litigation.
TRC – Call 26: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to review and amend their respective statutes of limitations to ensure that they conform to the principle that governments and other entities cannot rely on limitation defences to defend legal actions of historical abuse brought by Aboriginal people.
TRC – Call 27: We call upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.
TRC – Call 28: We call upon law schools in Canada to require all law students to take a course in Aboriginal people and the law, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and antiracism.
TRC – Call 29: We call upon the parties and, in particular, the federal government, to work collaboratively with plaintiffs not included in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to have disputed legal issues determined expeditiously on an agreed set of facts.
TRC – Call 30: We call upon federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in custody over the next decade, and to issue detailed annual reports that monitor and evaluate progress in doing so.
TRC – Call 31: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide sufficient and stable funding to implement and evaluate community sanctions that will provide realistic alternatives to imprisonment for Aboriginal offenders and respond to the underlying causes of offending.
TRC – Call 32: We call upon the federal government to amend the Criminal Code to allow trial judges, upon giving reasons, to depart from mandatory minimum sentences and restrictions on the use of conditional sentences.
TRC – Call 36: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to work with Aboriginal communities to provide culturally relevant services to inmates on issues such as substance abuse, family and domestic violence, and overcoming the experience of having been sexually abused.
TRC – Call 37: We call upon the federal government to provide more supports for Aboriginal programming in halfway houses and parole services.
TRC – Call 38: We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal youth in custody over the next decade.
TRC – Call 39: We call upon the federal government to develop a national plan to collect and publish data on the criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization.
TRC – Call 40: We call on all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, to create adequately funded and accessible Aboriginal-specific victim programs and services with appropriate evaluation mechanisms.
TRC – Call 41: We call upon the federal government, in consultation with Aboriginal organizations, to appoint a public inquiry into the causes of, and remedies for, the disproportionate victimization of Aboriginal women and girls. The inquiry’s mandate would include:
i. Investigation into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.
ii. Links to the intergenerational legacy of residential schools.
TRC – Call 42: We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to the recognition and implementation of Aboriginal justice systems in a manner consistent with the Treaty and Aboriginal rights of Aboriginal peoples, the Constitution Act, 1982, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, endorsed by Canada in November 2012.
TRC – Call 47: We call upon federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous peoples and lands, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius, and to reform those laws, government policies, and litigation strategies that continue to rely on such concepts
TRC – Call 50: In keeping with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal organizations, to fund the establishment of Indigenous law institutes for the development, use, and understanding of Indigenous laws and access to justice in accordance with the unique cultures of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.
TRC – Call 51: We call upon the Government of Canada, as an obligation of its fiduciary responsibility, to develop a policy of transparency by publishing legal opinions it develops and upon which it acts or intends to act, in regard to the scope and extent of Aboriginal and Treaty rights.
TRC – Call 52: We call upon the Government of Canada, provincial and territorial governments, and the courts to adopt the following legal principles:
i. Aboriginal title claims are accepted once the Aboriginal claimant has established occupation over a particular territory at a particular point in time.
ii. Once Aboriginal title has been established, the burden of proving any limitation on any rights arising from the existence of that title shifts to the party asserting such a limitation.
TRC – Call 58: We call upon the Pope to issue an apology to Survivors, their families, and communities for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in the spiritual, cultural, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children in Catholic-run residential schools. We call for that apology to be similar to the 2010 apology issued to Irish victims of abuse and to occur within one year of the issuing of this Report and to be delivered by the Pope in Canada.
TRC – Call 71: We call upon all chief coroners and provincial vital statistics agencies that have not provided to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada their records on the deaths of Aboriginal children in the care of residential school authorities to make these documents available to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.
TRC – Call 72: We call upon the federal government to allocate sufficient resources to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to allow it to develop and maintain the National Residential School Student Death Register established by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.
TRC – Call 73: We call upon the federal government to work with churches, Aboriginal communities, and former residential school students to establish and maintain an online registry of residential school cemeteries, including, where possible, plot maps showing the location of deceased residential school children.
TRC – Call 74: We call upon the federal government to work with the churches and Aboriginal community leaders to inform the families of children who died at residential schools of the child’s burial location, and to respond to families’ wishes for appropriate commemoration ceremonies and markers, and reburial in home communities where requested.
TRC – Call 75: We call upon the federal government to work with provincial, territorial, and municipal governments, churches, Aboriginal communities, former residential school students, and current landowners to develop and implement strategies and procedures for the ongoing identification, documentation, maintenance, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries or other sites at which residential school children were buried. This is to include the provision of appropriate memorial ceremonies and commemorative markers to honour the deceased children.
TRC – Call 76: We call upon the parties engaged in the work of documenting, maintaining, commemorating, and protecting residential school cemeteries to adopt strategies in accordance with the following principles:
i. The Aboriginal community most affected shall lead the development of such strategies.
ii. Information shall be sought from residential school Survivors and other Knowledge Keepers in the development of such strategies.
iii. Aboriginal protocols shall be respected before any potentially invasive technical inspection and investigation of a cemetery site.

Imagine Calgary – Target 55: By 2010, all public institutions and organizations implement sustainability principles (e.g. Melbourne Principles) in decision-making and reporting, using tools such as triple bottom line.
Imagine Calgary – Target 65: By 2008, beginning with the approval of the 100-year vision, all government decisions protect individual freedoms, ensure that people meet their obligations and improve quality of life.
Imagine Calgary – Target 66: By 2008, and every year thereafter, groups/organizations/government report on how they have considered and adopted the imagineCALGARY targets and strategies that are relevant to them and in which they have been identified as having a role.
Imagine Calgary – Target 109: By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians of every age and ability report that they value and have mutually supportive relationships in several settings, such as at home, school and work and in the community.
Imagine Calgary – Target 114: By 2010, at least 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they volunteer for the benefit of others who are outside their circles of family and friends.
TRC – Call 53: We call upon the Parliament of Canada, in consultation and collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to enact legislation to establish a National Council for Reconciliation. The legislation would establish the council as an independent, national, oversight body with membership jointly appointed by the Government of Canada and national Aboriginal organizations, and consisting of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal members. Its mandate would include, but not be limited to, the following:
i. Monitor, evaluate, and report annually to Parliament and the people of Canada on the Government of Canada’s post-apology progress on reconciliation to ensure that government accountability for reconciling the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown is maintained in the coming years.
ii. Monitor, evaluate, and report to Parliament and the people of Canada on reconciliation progress across all levels and sectors of Canadian society, including the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action.
iii. Develop and implement a multi-year National Action Plan for Reconciliation, which includes research and policy development, public education programs, and resources.
iv. Promote public dialogue, public/private partnerships, and public initiatives for reconciliation.
TRC – Call 54: We call upon the Government of Canada to provide multi-year funding for the National Council for Reconciliation to ensure that it has the financial, human, and technical resources required to conduct its work, including the endowment of a National Reconciliation Trust to advance the cause of reconciliation.
TRC – Call 55: We call upon all levels of government to provide annual reports or any current data requested by the National Council for Reconciliation so that it can report on the progress towards reconciliation. The reports or data would include, but not be limited to:
i. The number of Aboriginal children—including Métis and Inuit children—in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, the reasons for apprehension, and the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies.
ii. Comparative funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves.
iii. The educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people.
iv. Progress on closing the gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in a number of health indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.
v. Progress on eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal children in youth custody over the next decade.
vi. Progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization and other crimes.
vii. Progress on reducing the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the justice and correctional systems.
TRC – Call 56: We call upon the prime minister of Canada to formally respond to the report of the National Council for Reconciliation by issuing an annual “State of Aboriginal Peoples” report, which would outline the government’s plans for advancing the cause of reconciliation.

 

References

City of Calgary 2020 Sustainability Direction: www.calgary.ca/PDA/pd/Pages/Office-of-Sustainability/2020-Sustainability-direction.aspx

Energy Futures Lab: http://energyfutureslab.com/vision-and-innovation-pathways/

Enough for All Strategy – Calgary Poverty Reduction Initiative: www.enoughforall.ca

imagineCALGARY Plan for Long Range Sustainability: www.imaginecalgary.ca/what-imaginecalgary/plan

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada – Calls to Action: www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf